Guuytss

 

I ve just met the director, vice president and president of the soosung company

 

In different situations

 

So each of them we would drink a coffee or a green tea

 

And like.. they would ask ne if i like to drink and if i wanna have sangopsal and i was so not prepare for this questions but now we are going to have dinner hahahha

 

Ops.. one more card for my new collection

 

ooh wait.. two more

 

3 hrs later

 

Im comming back to school

 

But i gotta a joob

 

Dude everything was in korean.. they speak less englisj than julia

 

But for what i could see was all about international relationships.. the korea research institute doesnt have anything to do with the soosung engineer company. But for now i ll be tge bridge between them too since they will visit each other with me!!

 

Hahahahha ok.. i may not me any piece of crapp in this whole situation but since they will carry me it means spending the day going from one place to the other by jeep cars and having dinner drinking soju with beer and sangopsal since they know its ny favorite hahaja

 

And one more thing is that i had this kinda fried rice soup that i v never tried before

 

Nothibg special about it

 

But since i d never had it they ordrr for me too

 

But they all talked about other countries and companys all time.. asking such things as korean culture related.

 

From that time i saw myself as a nerdy cause i really wanted to talk about their company and my work in there and whatever more haha but it was nice of them too.. they asked me to teach them englishm ha ha ha ha

 

Ok.. spaming!! Ttys gyyss

 

  • colee!!!

     

    hahahah fiih a vida aqui eh uma loucura mesmo

     

    voltei a pouco tempo de quase uma entrevista de emprego

     

    mas ja tava tudo arranjado

     

    so tinha que conehcer a empresa e os chefinhos

     
     
  • Erik Baptista
    9:45pm

     
     
    Erik Baptista

    boa hein

     
     
  • Bárbara Rangel
    9:45pm

     
     
    Bárbara Rangel

    resultado: tenho mais 7 cartoes de visita da galera

     
     
  • Erik Baptista
    9:46pm

     
     
    Erik Baptista

    e tu já tá desembolando no coreano?

     

    auiahuaihia

     

    mas vai rolar mesmo?

     
     
  • Bárbara Rangel
    9:46pm

     
     
    Bárbara Rangel

    passei duas horas circulando de um pra outro direto, sub siretor, sub presidente e presidente, e para cada um era uma rodada de chazinho!

     
     
  • Erik Baptista
    9:47pm

     
     
    Erik Baptista

    caraca, q doidera

     
     
  • Bárbara Rangel
    9:47pm

     
     
    Bárbara Rangel

    hahahah depoiis como todo bom coreano, assim que bateu 5 da tarde no relogio, fomos jantar

     

    eles perguntaram minha comida preferida aqui, eu falei, e todos os desejos foram realizados

     
     
  • Erik Baptista
    9:47pm

     
     
    Erik Baptista

    sério? q horário bizarro

     

    aaaaaaaaaah

     

    entao o trampo já é seu!!!!

     
     
  • Bárbara Rangel
    9:47pm

     
     
    Bárbara Rangel

    carne de porco grelhada com todos os side dishes do mundo e muita cerveja e soju, pq eu adoro beber!

     

    SIIIMM

     

    hahahahah cara foi muito estrannho erik

     

    hahahahahhaha

     

    passamos 3 horas sentados no chao comendo

     

    naquela smesinhas pequenas

     
     
  • Erik Baptista
    9:48pm

     
     
    Erik Baptista

    é empresa de que?

     
     
  • Bárbara Rangel
    9:48pm

     
     
    Bárbara Rangel

    e eles descobriram que ue fumava

     

    entao foi um fumace e tchaans (como eles falam saude) pra todo lado

     

    engenharia.. vou trabalhar na parte de urbanismo

     

    pelo o que eu entendi..

     

    ninguem fala ingles aqui! eh foda!

     

    eh exatemnete igual o filme

     
     
  • Erik Baptista
    9:49pm

     
     
    Erik Baptista

    caralho, q aventura hein, barbara!!!

     
     
  • Bárbara Rangel
    9:49pm

     
     
    Bárbara Rangel

    eu riiiiiiia.. pq teve uma parte quenao se voce lembra mas o principal do filme tava pra gravar o comercial.. ai o diretor fala mil coisas.. e a tradutora so diz uma frase? EH ISSO!

     
     
  • Erik Baptista
    9:49pm

     
     
    Erik Baptista

    lembro total

     

    ahahahahhahahaa

     
     
  • Bárbara Rangel
    9:50pm

     
     
    Bárbara Rangel

    genial.. mas os caras que tavam comigo, um deles ja saiu com a dilma umas 3 vezes

     

    vai saber o que esses safadinhos estavam fazendo no brasil ne..

     
     
  • Erik Baptista
    9:50pm

     
     
    Erik Baptista

    sério? nu

     

    vc entrou pra ganhar então hein

     

    ahahahaha

     
     
  • Bárbara Rangel
    9:50pm

     
     
    Bárbara Rangel

    ele disse que ela eh uma mulher muito forte

     
     
  • Erik Baptista
    9:50pm

     
     
    Erik Baptista

    tavam fazendo turismo sexual

     

    ahahahahaha

     
     
  • Bárbara Rangel
    9:50pm

     
     
    Bárbara Rangel

    eu sei la.. nem eu to entendendo esse lance todo

     

    hahahahah fato!

     

    hahahahahhahaha quando ele disse,, strong woman!!

     

    e deixou um lance no ar

     

    hahahha ai eh falei BAAAO ENTAO NEE

     

    hahahahah etaa noss

     

    mas nao fiih.. coreano nao eh pra mim nao.

     
     
  • Erik Baptista
    9:52pm

     
     
    Erik Baptista

    tu fica ai até quando?

     
     
  • Bárbara Rangel
    10:08pm

     
     
    Bárbara Rangel

    set do ano que vem

     
     
  • Erik Baptista
    10:08pm

     
     
    Erik Baptista

    pode cre

     

    e tá legal o esquema de estudo ai?

     
     
  • Bárbara Rangel
    10:54pm

     
     
    Bárbara Rangel

    ta maneiro! metade coreano metade ingles. mas sussa.. eh dificil as vezes. conceito eh um conceito desconhecido pros coreanos..

     

    mas bem, vai rolando!

     

    aqui sao 11 da noite agora vou fumar um cigarro la embairo

     

    que aqui dentro do dormitorio eh prohibited!

     

    beijocas

     
     
  • Erik Baptista
    10:59pm

     
     
    Erik Baptista

    ahahahha

     

    vai lá

     
     
 
 

Influencing one another

“The problem, often not discovered until late in life, is that when you look for things in life like love, meaning, motivation, it implies they are sitting behind a tree or under a rock. The most successful people in life recognize, that in life they create their own love, they manufacture their own meaning, they generate their own motivation.

For me, I am driven by two main philosophies, know more today about the world than I knew yesterday. And lessen the suffering of others. You’d be surprised how far that gets you.”

— Neil deGrasse Tyson (reddit, 2012)

The invention of abstraction, Vasily Kandisky

Another manuscript from the same year (1904) already bears the decisivee, programmatic title The Language of Colour. There Kandinsky proclaims of the very first page: “We painters of our time cannot suddently abstract from the shapes that nature offers us.”

And he therefore proposes: “We should not think of nature, we need to forget it when we have to make a colour composition.”

In all these deliberations, which would later inform his important and (for abstract art) highly influential essay ‘On the Spiritual in Art’, there is often concern about the meaning of pure ‘colour thinking’: “Combining beautiful colours that have no further meaning, is nothing but ornamentation. This would be the result of emancipation if we entirely disregarded the inner value of colour. But as soon as putting together colours awakens psychic echoes, that is composition.” “Where the object or the usual physical form intensifies or even causes the psychic effect of colour, this form has also to be clearly rendered. But where colour alone… has sufficient effect without the physical shape, this shape is not required at all… The ideal form is the absence of physical shape, as this limits the effect and as it were makes it too specialized and much too definite. But the indefinite has a greater wealth result.”

 

From these short extracts, but particularly in the revised texts of the Language of Colour of 1908-9, which largely formulates the contexts of On the Spiritual in Art, it is evident that Kandinsky at this stage had made greater and more radical progress with his theorical deliberations that in his art Statements such as “In order for colour to have an effect, it needs as such to be freed from real form” shows which way his thinking was heading. 

Abstraction was thus seen by Kandisnky more as an essential revival of art than something actually thanslated to paintings. It was there as a discovery and postulate before it could be incorporated into pictures. 

(…)

page 23 of Vasily Kandisky book. 

Henri Cartier

I’m not interested in documenting. Documenting is extremely dull and I’m a very bad reporter. When I had an exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art in 1946, my friend, Robert Capa, told me, “Henri, be very careful. You must not have a label of a surrealist photographer. If you do, you won’t have an assignment and you’ll be like a hothouse plant. Do whatever you like, but the label should be ‘photojournalist.’ ”

SHOPTALK

All my training was surrealism. I still feel very close to the surrealists. But Capa was extremely sound. So I never mentioned surrealism. That’s my private affair. And what I want, what I’m looking for — that’s my business. Otherwise I never would have an assignment. Journalism is a way of noting — well, some journalists are wonderful writers and others are just putting facts one after the other. And facts are not interesting. It’s a point of view on facts which is important, and in photography it is the evocation. Some photographs are like a Chekhov short story or a Maupassant story. They’re quick things and there’s a whole world in them. But one is unconscious of it while shooting.

Henri Cartier-Bresson and Sheila Turner-Seed

Sheila Turner-Seed asks Mr. Cartier-Bresson about Robert Capa and David “Chim” Seymour.

That’s a wonderful thing with a camera. It jumps out of you. I’m extremely impulsive. Terribly. It’s really a pain in the neck for my friends and family. I’m a bunch of nerves. But I take advantage of it in photography. I never think. I set, quick! I hit!

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/06/20/henri-cartier-bresson-living-and-looking/?_r=0

HOW CAFFEINE CAN CRAMP CREATIVITY

By MARIA KONNIKOVA  l  The New Yorker June 17, 2013

Honoré de Balzac is said to have consumed the equivalent of fifty cups of coffee a day at his peak. He did not drink coffee, though—he pulverized coffee beans into a fine dust and ingested the dry powder on an empty stomach. He described the approach as “horrible, rather brutal,” to be tried only by men of “excessive vigor.” He documented the effects of the process in his 1839 essay “Traité des Excitants Modernes” (“Treatise on Modern Stimulants”): “Sparks shoot all the way up to the brain” while “ideas quick-march into motion like battalions of a grand army to its legendary fighting ground, and the battle rages.”

Balzac’s novels and plays endure, but modern science is challenging his view of caffeine causing ideas to “quick-march into motion.” While caffeine has numerous benefits, it appears that the drug may undermine creativity more than it stimulates it.

When we drink a caffeinated beverage, the caffeine quickly crosses the blood-brain barrier—an interface of sorts between the brain and the body’s circulatory system, designed to protect the central nervous system from chemicals in the blood that might harm it—and proceeds to block the activity of a substance called adenosine. Normally, a central function of adenosine is to inhibit the release of various chemicals into the brain, lowering energy levels and promoting sleep, among other regulatory bodily functions. When it’s blocked, we’re less likely to fall asleep on our desks or feel our focus drifting. According to a recent review of some hundred studies, caffeine has a number of distinct benefits. Chief among them are that it boosts energy and decreases fatigue; enhances physical, cognitive, and motor performance; and aids short-term memory, problem solving, decision making, and concentration.

But all of that comes at a cost. Science is only beginning to unravel the full complexity behind different forms of creative accomplishment; creativity is notoriously difficult to study in a laboratory setting, and the choice of one approach over another limits the way that creativity can be measured. Still, we do know that much of what we associate with creativity—whether writing a sonnet or a mathematical proof—has to do with the ability to link ideas, entities, and concepts in novel ways. This ability depends in part on the very thing that caffeine seeks to prevent: a wandering, unfocussed mind.

Creative insights and imaginative solutions often occur when we stop working on a particular problem and let our mind move on to something unrelated. In one recent study, participants showed marked improvements on a task requiring creative thought—thinking of alternative uses for a common object, such as a newspaper—after they had engaged in a different, undemanding task that facilitated mind wandering. The more their mind wandered when they stepped away, the better they fared at being creative. In fact, the benefit was not seen at all when the subjects engaged in an unrelated but demanding task.

In other words, a break in intense concentration may increase unconscious associative processing. That, in turn, allows us to perceive connections that we would otherwise miss. Letting our minds wander may also increase communication between the brain’s default mode network—the parts of our brain that are more active when we’re at rest—and its executive areas, which are used in so-called higher reasoning and decision-making functions. These two regions become activated right before we solve problems of insight. Caffeine prevents our focus from becoming too diffuse; it instead hones our attention in a hyper-vigilant fashion.

Caffeine also inhibits another mental process that’s necessary for creative thinking: sleep. A 2009 study showed that people who experienced REM sleep performed better on two tests of creative thinking than those who simply rested or napped without entering the REM cycle. During REM, their brains were able to integrate unassociated information so that, upon waking up, they were more adept at solving problems they had been primed with earlier. Without sound sleep, the effect dissipated. Sleep deprivation has also been linked to negative effects on other elements associated with creativity and thought clarity: it diminishes emotional intelligence, constructive thinking, and the ability to cope with stress.

In one study, consuming two hundred milligrams of caffeine significantly increased the amount of time it took for people to fall asleep later that night. (An eight-ounce cup of brewed coffee contains ninety-five to two hundred milligrams of caffeine, according to the Mayo Clinic.) It also had a profound effect on the quality of that sleep: it lowered sleep efficiency; the duration of stage-two sleep (the point at which our bodies prepare to enter deep sleep); and the spectral power of delta-wave frequencies (which are closely associated with the depth and quality of sleep). Other studies have linked caffeine to diminished sleep quality and efficiency, along with an increase in the number of times people wake during the night and how tired they feel in the morning.

It may be possible to reap the positive effects of caffeine without the creativity-diminishing side effects, however. Some research has found that attributes like increased alertness and focus can be replicated by the placebo effect. In a 2011 study at the University of East London, a group of psychologists examined the effects of caffeine on problem-solving ability and emotional responses. In the double-blind study, eighty-eight habitual coffee drinkers were given cups of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee at random. Half were told that they were receiving regular coffee, and half were informed that they were given decaf. Each participant then completed tasks that measured things like reaction time, self-control, reward motivation, and mood. In the Stroop task, which measures reaction time, improved accuracy was observed in subjects who believed they had ingested caffeinated coffee, even if they had only consumed decaf. Subjects who received caffeine and were told they were drinking decaf did not show an improved reaction time. Likewise, in a measure of reward motivation, the Card Arranging Reward Responsivity Objective Test, the participants who believed they had consumed caffeine sorted the cards more quickly than those who believed they’d consumed decaf.

Balzac, then, may not have been personally quite as far off the mark as it seems. If he expected caffeine to have a certain effect, he may have been able to attain it simply by believing it, regardless of whether the caffeine itself was causing those effects. And, ultimately, for the hours of research and focussed thinking that form the raw material of most any creative endeavor—in Balzac’s case, the endless pages of plot and character development—an extremely caffeinated approach may be productive, as long as the mind is allowed to wander every now and again.

Maria Konnikova is the author of the New York Times best-seller “Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes.” She has a Ph.D. in Psychology from Columbia University.

MEMPHIS

MEMPHIS was a Milan-based collective of young furniture and product designers led by the veteran Ettore Sottsass. After its 1981 debut, Memphis dominated the early 1980s design scene with its post-modernist style.

Jasper Morrison remembers breaking into “a kind of cold sweat” and a “feeling of shock and panic” when he stumbled into the opening of a design exhibition at the Arc ’74 showroom in Milan on 18 September 1981. “It was the weirdest feeling,” he recalled years later, “you were in one sense repulsed by the objects, or I was, but also immediately freed by the sort of total rule-breaking.”

The rule-breaking had begun in December 1980 when Ettore Sottsass, one of Italy’s architectural grandees, met with a group of younger architects in his apartment on Milan’s Via San Galdino. He was in his 60s and his collaborators – Martine Bedin, Aldo Cibic, Michele De Lucchi, Matteo Thun and Marco Zanini – were in their 20s. With them was the writer, Barbara Radice. They were there to discuss Sottsass’ plans to produce a line of furniture with an old friend, Renzo Brugola, owner of a carpentry workshop.

Originally dubbed The New Design, the project was rechristened Memphis after the Bob Dylan lyric “Stuck Inside of Mobile (With the Memphis Blues Again)” stuck repeatedly at “Memphis Blues Again” on Sottsass’ record player. “Sottsass said: ‘Okay, let’s call it Memphis,” wrote Radice, “and everyone thought it was a great name: Blues, Tennessee, rock’n’roll, American suburbs, and then Egypt, the Pharoahs’ capital, the holy city of the god, Ptah.”

By February, the group, bolstered by the addition of George Sowden and Nathalie du Pasquier, had completed over a hundred drawings of furniture, lamps and ceramics. There was no set formula. “No-one mentioned forms, colours, styles, decorations,” observed Radice. That was the point. After decades of modernist doctrine, Sottsass and his collaborators longed to be liberated from the tyranny of smart, but soulless ‘good taste’ in design.

Their solution was to continue the experiments with uncoventional materials, historic forms, kitsch motifs and gaudy colours begun by Studio Alchymia, the radical late 1970s Italian design group to which Sottsass and De Lucchi had belonged. When the young Jasper Morrison and a couple of thousand others crowded into Arc ’74 on 18 September 1981 they discovered furniture made from the flashily coloured plastic laminates emblazoned with kitsch geometric and leopard-skin patterns usually found in 1950s comic books or cheap cafés.

Other pieces of furniture and lights were made from industrial materials – printed glass, celluloids, fireflake finishes, neon tubes and zinc-plated sheet-metals – jazzed up with flamboyant colours and patterns, spangles and glitter. By glorying in the cheesiness of consumer culture, Memphis was “quoting from suburbia,” as Sottsass put it. “Memphis is not new, Memphis is everywhere.” Matteo Thun described Memphis as “a mental gymnasium”.

Sottsass’ 1981 Beverly cabinet sported green and yellow ‘snakeskin’ laminate doors with brown ‘tortoiseshell’ book shelves at a topsy turvy angle and a bright red bulb in the light. Sowden’s 1981 Oberoi armchairs combined tomato red upholstery with bright yellow or blue legs and Nathalie du Pasquier’s pink and black mosaic print in a chubby 1950s style. Martine Bedin’s 1981 Superlamp ressembled an illuminated dachsund with multi-coloured bulbs framing a richly-coloured fibreglass arc. Team Memphis posed for a group portrait lounging in Tawaraya, a boxing ring-cum-playpen with a monochrome striped base, pastel-coloured ‘ropes’ and a white light bulb at each corner designed by a Japanese collaborator, Masanori Umeda. The finishing touch was the invitation to the exhibition opening: a postcard image of a yawning dinosaur painted against a lightning-scarred sky by Luciano Paccagnella.

It was an exuberant two-fingered salute to the design establishment after years in which colour and decoration had been been taboo. Memphis also scoffed at the notion that ‘good’ design had to last. “It is no coincidence that the people who work for Memphis don’t pursue a metaphysic aesthetic idea or an absolute of any kind, much less eternity,” observed Sottsass.

“Today everything one does is consumed. It is dedicated to life, not to eternity.”

Little about Memphis was truly innovative. Most of its concepts had been trail-blazed by Alchymia. Yet the Memphis collaborators were much more adept at communicating their ideas and at manipulating Ettore Sottsass’ contacts. He even persuaded Artemide, the Italian lighting manufacturer, to work with them.

Within the design world, Memphis was a watershed. “You were either for it, or against it. “All the boring old designers hated it. The rest of us loved it,” recalled Bill Moggridge, co-founder of the IDEO industrial design group. Among the old guard was Vico Magistretti. “This furniture offers no possibility of development whatsoever,” he declaimed. “It is only a variant of fashion.”

Memphis was seen as equally sensational outside the closed confines of the design community. The packed opening party, cool graphics and hip young designers – male and female, from different countries – proved irresistible to the mass media. Perfectly in tune with an era when pop culture was dominated by the post-punk flamboyance of early 1980s new romanticism, Memphis was also a colourful, clearly defined manifestation of the often obscure post-modernist theories then so influential in art and architecture.

Fashion designer, Karl Lagerfeld, furnished his Monte Carlo apartment with Memphis. The US architect, Michael Graves, joined the collective: as did Javier Mariscal from Spain, Arata Isozaki and Shiro Kurumata from Japan. Memphis was splashed across magazines worldwide. There were exhibitions in London, Los Angeles, Tokyo, San Francisco, New York and back in Milan. But Sottsass became increasingly disillusioned with Memphis and the media circus around it, in 1985 he announced that he was leaving the collective.

Like Miles Davis, who resolutely refused to replay old music, throughout his long career, Sottsass always insisted on moving forward rather than reliving past glories. For him, quitting Memphis at the height of its fame was the only logical course of action. “Acclaimed as a symbol and persecuted like a rock star, far from feeling satisfaction or pleasure, he (Sottsass) sank into one of the worst crises of his life,” wrote Barbara Radice a few years later.

Having broken free from Memphis, Sottsass concentrated his energies on his own architectural practise, Sottsass Associati, where he continued to work with many of his young collaborators, including Branzi, Cibic and De Lucchi.

“I am a designer and I want to design things,” Sottsass had written a few years before founding Memphis. “What else would I do? Go fishing?”

© Design Museum

Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter… and Spring (The Mountain)

Finally completing his long self-discipline, the apprentice ties the monastery’s large, circular grinding stone to his body. It is emblematic of the Buddhist bhavachakra, the wheel of life and rebirth, and he takes a statue of the buddha-to-come, Maitreya from the monastery, and he goes to climb to the summit of the tallest of the surrounding mountains. As he climbs, dragging the stone wheel behind him and struggling to carry the statue, he reflects upon the fish, the frog, and the snake he tormented. Finally attaining the summit, he prays and leaves the statue seated on top of the circular grinding stone, overlooking the monastery in the lake far below.

Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter… and Spring

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tdB-B4s3gVM

s: http://itwonlast.tumblr.com/post/57008635877/finally-completing-his-long-self-discipline-the

David Foster Wallace Once Wrote a Very Strange Rap Book

David Foster Wallace Once Wrote a Very Strange Rap Book

By BRANDON SODERBERG  l  Spin  Sept.18, 2012

Since the tragic death of David Foster Wallace on September 15, 2008, we’ve seen a small but significant number of works by the author unearthed for the first time, or cannily repackaged. These include his incomplete novel The Pale King, his 2005 commencement speech for Kenyon College, and even his undergraduate senior thesis. Still out of print, however, and selling for hundreds of dollars used, is Wallace and Mark Costello’s 1990 book Signifying Rappers: Rap and Race in the Urban Present. This book is often diminished by those studying Wallace, even though it is an early example of the author’s published non-fiction. According to 2003’s Understanding David Foster Wallace by Marshall Boswell, Wallace’s non-fiction career was based “on the strength of Signifying Rappers.” And so, it seems strange to treat a book about hip-hop co-authored by David Foster Wallace as barely even a footnote, especially when his college papers have been made available.

One problem, it seems, is that Wallace was candid in his dislike of his early work, and didn’t comment on the book very much. As a result, Signifying Rappers has garnered a reputation as insubstantial, or even a little bit of an embarrassment. In D.T. Max’s new biography of Wallace, Every Love Story is a Ghost Story, Max dismisses the author’s interest in rap: “Wallace’s passion for rap was theoretical, verbal, abstract. The music never touched him as did the stoner songs of high school or the moody tripping songs of Amherst. His interest had the quality of a very smart kid slumming it.” Most slumming-it smart kids didn’t take the time to co-author a book about the then-burgeoning genre, though.

In the Village Voice , with the snarky glee of an Internet rap-blog commenter in the 2000s,Robert Christgau mocked Costello and Wallace’s inability to get their facts straight. Indeed, they did forget about Run-DMC’s King Of Rock when they moved through the group’s discography, and they hinged the book’s conclusion on misheard lyrics from Ice-T’s “The Hunted Child.” As the 140-page theory-soaked rant comes to a close, Costello and Wallace celebrate “a five-minute untraceable cut” with the “inscrutable chorus ‘Honeychild / I’m the honeychild.’”

Wallace didn’t like the book and “the dean of American rock critics” panned it, so most people decided that it wasn’t worth reading. Christgau’s criticisms are certainly valid, but they also seem beside the point. This is a book that works because its authors have more enthusiasm than knowledge, and don’t know any of the rules for how they’re “supposed” to approach rap music. That can be thrilling.

Signifying Rappers is also incredibly mindful of its whiteness, and even seems to predict the self-aware, open-source-inspired explosion of excited, amateur-ish blogging of the 2000s. The first part of the book is called “Entitlement,” and the book’s premise is pretty simple: Here are two dorks with “an uncomfortable, somewhat furtive, and distinctly white enthusiasm for a certain music called rap/hip-hop.” While their outsider-ness allows for goofy gaffes like not knowing an Ice-T song they probably should know if they’re going to write a book about rap, it also provides them with a nutty, ballsy freedom to riff and explore. A favorite is Costello’s dissection of Jesse Jackson’s lie about witnessing Martin Luther King Jr. die while sporting a shirt that Jackson claimed was splattered with the blood of MLK. Jackson wasn’t there, and this epic fib becomes (if you buy into Costello’s theorizing) one of the sources for hip-hop’s signifying and \complex wrestling between reality and “reality.”

Even if Signifying Rappers‘ obsequious style puts you off, it remains a fascinating artifact. It’s quasi-juvenilia from one of American literature’s best postmodern writers. And it’s hip-hop commentary from a time when the genre was still forming, and the rules for how to approach this stuff critically, weren’t established quite yet. It gives the book an unfettered freedom that couldn’t exist at any other moment in hip-hop history.